Pet Poison Prevention Tips: Common Toxic Food and Plants

Posted by Christy Caplan
Pet Poison Prevention Month Toxic Tips

How do you protecting your pets from common household poisonsWhat do you do if you think your companion animal swallowed something toxic or accidentally ate something that fell from your purse? A pill perhaps? A piece of gum?

Human medications are often an issue so even with the child safety top tightly closed pet owners should keep these items on a top shelf! These include Advil, Aleve, and Motrin. What about household cleaners? Many toxic items are hiding in your bathroom like soaps and sunscreens!

Human foods are an issue!

There is also a laundry list of food items in your home that are dangerous for your animals:

  • Coffee grounds
  • Fatty foods
  • Tea
  • Chocolate
  • Avocados
  • Alcohol
  • Yeast dough
  • Grapes/raisins
  • Salt
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Any product containing Xylitol (even certain peanut butter brands use this so read the ingredients)

Some substances can be dangerous or even fatal if ingested so it's really important to know when you need to rush to the emergency room. If you come home or step into the kitchen and suspect one of these items were ingested, call your vet or DVM immediately.

Editor's Note: Inducing vomiting is NOT always the right thing to do so you need to call your vet first and ask about how best to proceed. Some items will do more harm if they are vomited so be careful!

What about toxic plants? 

According to the ASPCA, the list is long - so please visit their site for the complete list (more than 700 plants). Here are the more common plants found that pet parents should be careful around when they have their animals with them:

  • Azaleas: Entire plant is toxic
  • Daffodil: Bulbs are toxic
  • Day lily: Entire plant is toxic for cats
  • Easter lily: Entire plant is toxic for cats
  • Potato: Shoots and sprouts are toxic
  • Rhododendron: Leaves are toxic
  • English Ivy: Entire plant is toxic, especially leaves
  • Iris: Leaves and root are toxic
  • Nightshade: Leaves and berries are toxic
  • Rhubarb: Leaves are toxic
  • Sago Palm: Entire plant and seeds are toxic
  • Wild Black Cherry: Leaves and pits are toxic

Call your vet rather than only watching for GI upset if you know your dog was eating leaves or berries of any of these mentioned above. Kidney failure can occur, so you must keep your pets safe from nibbling on the leaves of these plants. Some of these are common household plants which makes this list even more important.

Every March is Poison Prevention Awareness Month and a great time to make sure these pet toxins are top of mind for pet owners.

The best advice?

The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) tells us,

"Time is critical for successfully treating accidental poisoning. Pick up the phone and call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center(1-888-426-4435; a consultation fee may apply). Be prepared to provide your pet's breed, age, weight, and any symptoms. Keep the product container or plant sample with you to assist in identification so the appropriate treatment recommendations can be made."

Keep a list of these poisonous substances in your kitchen so you don't forget! The list should include common household products, cleaning products, over-the-counter human medications, and toxic foods in case you need an easy reference tool. Keep the ASPCA Poison Control Center phone number on the document as well.

Try this!

Toxic and Safe Foods, Toxic Plants and Toxic Foods Poison for Pets Dogs Cats Emergency Home Alone 5" x 7" Veterinarian Approved Refrigerator Safety Magnet

Toxic Foods Magnet
Amazon

A magnet is a wonderful idea so you don't have to write it all down!

Please leave us a comment, if there is something we missed on this list. 

WATCH: People Are Poisoning Dogs 

 

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Pet Poison Prevention Tips: Common Toxic Food and Plants