Grooming a Samoyed Means Piles of Fur and 2 Hours, But This is Why It's Important

Posted by Kat Tretina

Here is proof that grooming your dog is an essential task. 

Double-coated breeds like Siberian Huskies and Samoyeds have thick fur with a soft downy undercoat and coarse guard hairs on the top layer. The undercoat sheds a great deal and can come out in clumps. Regular grooming is required to maintain the coat's appearance and prevent any mats from appearing.

Don't think you can skip the grooming by shaving or clipping the dog's fur; the skin of these breeds is very delicate, and you can put your pup at risk of developing skin cancer or infection. Additionally, the coat actually works to regulate your pup's body temperature, helping him stay cool even in the summer months. If you cut the coat, he loses that aid and can overheat more easily.

Short daily grooming sessions often work best. By just spending fifteen to twenty a minutes a day brushing, you can minimize shedding and keep your dog looking good. If you can only brush your dog every week, you'll need to spend a lot more time brushing to get rid of the excess undercoat and eliminate any mats. If you procrastinate and put it off even longer, you can end up spending hours brushing and have mountains of fur around you.

That's the situation this young man found himself in with his adult Samoyed:

By breaking it into short sessions, you can keep the coat under control and not end up with so much hair. Your dog will get used to the grooming and be just as relaxed as the pup in the video.

While the coats are a lot of work, the results are worth it. Your dog will look more beautiful and more healthy with that excess hair removed. And if you do collect a lot of the hair, keep in mind that it could be useful! Many people prize double-coated breeds' hair to use as yarn to knit garments.

Start a grooming routine and keep your pet looking and feeling his best.

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Grooming a Samoyed Means Piles of Fur and 2 Hours, But This is Why It's Important