Why You Should Become a Foster Parent for Shelter Pets

Posted by Paige Cerulli
Comfortable mixed breed dog resting on the couch

Can’t adopt? Becoming a foster parent is a great way that you can still help foster pets in need.

Have you ever thought about becoming a foster parent for shelter pets? Becoming a foster parent is a great way to make a real difference in the lives of shelter pets.

Here are just a few reasons to consider becoming a foster parent.

Provide a Shelter Pet with a Home Experience

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Kevin Jarrett via Flickr

Living in a shelter isn’t like living in a home or with a family. Some shelter pets may not have this experience for months or years, but if you become a foster parent, you can give shelter pets a loving home.

Even though a foster pet will be with you temporarily, you can give him the safety and security of having a loving home and family.

Increase a Pet’s Chances of Being Adopted

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jeffreyw via Flickr

An important part of fostering a pet is giving that pet socialization and training that he might not receive in a shelter. If you have other pets in your home, you can assess the shelter pet’s reaction and behavior around these pets.

You can also instill important training skills, like litter box training or obedience cues, making the pet more appealing to potential adopters. As a foster pet parent, your time and effort can give the pet a better chance at eventually being adopted.

Free Up a Place at a Shelter

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eva101 via Flickr

When you take a foster pet into your home, you’re opening up a spot in the shelter for another pet in need.

Fostering a pet lets a shelter take care of more pets than they have space for. It’s a great way to maximize a shelter’s effectiveness.

Enjoy the Pet’s Companionship

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mbtrama via Flickr

If you’re not ready for the long-term commitment of becoming a pet parent, fostering a shelter pet can be a great way to enjoy a pet’s companionship on a more temporary basis. In many arrangements, shelters pay for a pet’s veterinary care, and some cover food costs, too. If you can’t yet adopt a pet of your own, fostering may be a great option in the meantime.

If you’re interested in becoming a foster, speak with your local animal shelter. Each shelter has different requirements for their foster homes, and you’ll likely have to fill out an application.

Fostering a shelter pet is a great experience, and knowing that you’re doing a good deed makes fostering even better.

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Why You Should Become a Foster Parent for Shelter Pets