Sexy Vet Is Expert at Talking Softly to Pets

Posted by Stacey Venzel

WATCH NOW: The Sexiest Vet Is Also Really Good with Animals

Dr. Evan Antin soothes critters and swoons hearts.

Hubba hubba. People Pet Vet Dr. Evan Antin is an Internet heartthrob. He is easy on the eyes and he has a soft spot for animals.

Antin, a Kansas native, graduated from Colorado State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine and Biological Sciences in 2013. In 2014, People magazine dubbed him “Sexiest Beast Charmer” in the issue titled “Sexiest Man Alive,” followed up with Bored Panda’s exclusive “The Hottest Animal Doctor Ever That’ll Make You Want To Get Your Pet Checked.”

Later, he earned a spotlight in Veterinary Practice News. He currently works at a large, bustling clinic in Thousand Oaks, California called Conejo Valley Veterinary Hospital. (“Conejo” fittingly means “rabbit” in Spanish–one of Antin’s many patients.)

 

But it’s not just Antin’s, ahem, good looks that won over his fans. It’s the passion for his work and that cutesy way he talks to his animal patients. For most people, this sweet talk is reserved for privacy behind doors. But with this muscular, blue-eyed, brown-haired vet, he doesn’t shy away from baby talk to critters of all shapes and sizes, even in front of a camera.

See for yourself.


Antin holds his own–quite well–in a female-dominated field, one of few science-driven professions that has a smaller gender gap. He also likes to give back in his free time, pairing his love of travel with tropical wildlife rehabilitation excursions. He even uses his stardom to promote animal welfare, such as the misleading ecotourism surrounding elephant maltreatment in Asia and Africa.

The veterinarian started his own YouTube channel, which maintains an educational focus on practicing veterinary medicine. His social media pages, though, feature lots of adorable and, let’s face it, attractive photos of the man and his various patients.

For example:

Or how about this one:

#WildlifeSurgery is def one of the coolest parts of being a vet. It's just about the animals and getting them healthy again if possible and for the passion for the field of vetmed. This precious 4-5 month old opossum came to me with severe, irreversible right forelimb damage. I surgically amputated her arm and she was sent to live on her days at a wildlife educational facility. Please see the short video about her story on my YouTube channel (link in bio) and fall in love with her like I did 🤗❤️. FYI many times injured/orphaned/sick Willdife are not good candidates to be reintroduced back into the wild and much of those animals are either kept in captivity the rest of their lives or they're humanely euthanized. To be brutally honest well over 50% of wildlife must be euthanized because they will not survive in the wild with the significant injuries or illness they suffer by the time we see them. I know that's a depressing statistic but it's the honest truth-we do what we can and often the best thing for these misfortunate animals is not to let them fend for themselves in the wild when they're not acceptably equipped to do so. Remember, living as an animal in the wild is not rainbows & sunshine. Every day is a struggle and extremely stressful. Eat or be eaten. Fight to survive. Mother Nature is an absolute bitch sometimes and wild animals need every tool they have to make it another day and reproduce as best they can. Reproduction is what drives nature and evolution and wildife populations around the world….end soapbox. I hope you enjoy the video and I hope this post brings you a little reality on what it means to be a wild animal. Don't get me started on how mankind has only made things more challenging for our beloved wildife-habitat destruction, pollution, poaching, etc, the Sixth extinction is coming…Ok I'm really done now, lol. Watch the video, subscribe to my YouTube if you like and have a great night ☺️ #wildife #nature #wildvet #vet #veterinary #opossum #marsupial #northamericasonlymarsupial #wild #lovemothernature #respecther #remembershecanberealmeantoo #natureismyhappyplace @conejovet

A post shared by Evan Antin 🐊🐣🐒🐱🐶🐢🐖🐍🐅🐿🐇 (@dr.evanantin) on

No animal escapes his love:

They call me the Mexican Beaded Lizard matchmaker 💘 Jk, these lil monsters have been living together and breeding for a long time and very comfortable around one another. That being said, I generally recommend precaution before co-habitating reptiles together, even the same species. Cage aggression can lead to high stress and fatal injuries. For many reptiles it's not an issue but recommended for experienced reptile hobbyists. And check out my @wearfigs – super comfy scrubs that look good too 😷🤘🏼🚶🏻😎 #exotics #reptile #vet #wildvet #wearfigs #veterinary #vetmed #vetlife #lizardsdontkissever #dontkissareptile #defdontkissabeadedlizard #reptileherpesisforeveryo #nottruebutsalmonellaisreal!

A post shared by Evan Antin 🐊🐣🐒🐱🐶🐢🐖🐍🐅🐿🐇 (@dr.evanantin) on

Or muscles:

In case you haven’t seen enough, hop on over to Dr. Evan Antin’s Instagram page for more swooning opportunities.

And before you start soliciting proposals, he’s engaged… but as far as we know, still accepting new patients.

Do you know of a vet who should be featured for Wide Open Pets? Tag them in the comments below!

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Sexy Vet Is Expert at Talking Softly to Pets